Classic Book Review: Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit451I read Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury for the first time in middle school. I remembered it had a futuristic story and big meaning. Other than that, I didn’t remember much so I decided it was time to read it again. Especially after I picked it up at a book sale for $1. ūüôā

Futuristic Story

Setting novels in the future takes a lot of creativity but also a lot of knowledge. A great futuristic setting will be believable, with specific or vague science/theory to back up the created reality. Ray Bradbury certainly had the vision in 1953 when he published Fahrenheit 451.

Wall-sized, interactive TVs. Fireproof homes. Robot dogs. And of course, a society that limits the public’s ability to think freely.

Thankfully our society hasn’t stooped to book burning yet, but some of his imaginative predictions are not so far off.

Big Meaning

I remember Fahrenheit 451 having a strong affect on me in middle school. Growing up in a country where free speech is encourage at every corner and individuality is praised, it was strange to think of a world without those things. Thankfully, the magic of books helps us think outside our tiny little worlds.

Rereading the novel now, I was not impressed. I thought it lacked substance, emotion, and depth.

451

Overall

2.5 stars. Unfortunately, I found a lot of the characters to be dull. The pacing was inconsistent, slow and first then too fast at the peak of the action. That being said, I still believe this is an excellent book for middle age readers. It will open their eyes to a world different than their own without too much violence or depression. The reading level is also perfect for the middle school kid.

Interesting Fact: 

Did you know Fahrenheit 451 was originally published in a shorter version and titled The Fireman?!

Advertisements

About Sarah JS

Aspiring writer, lover of words, book nerd, working editor, and permanent student of the world

Posted on August 27, 2015, in Book Review and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. THANK YOU for saying you weren’t impressed. I read this, like you, a long long time ago but during my recent reread I felt like I was forcing myself to like it because classic.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: